Pilgrim Songs

In the Jewish Quarter of the Old City, Jerusalem, this arch commemorated a many-times destroyed Synagogue. It’s last destruction was in 1948 during the Arab-Israel War. After retaking the Old City in 1967, plans were made to build a new synagogue. The arch was erected in 1977. Finally, in 2010 a new synagogue was built and dedicated.
by Wil Robinson. 1987

For the last fifteen days, JonahzSong has looked at Psalms 120-134 collectively as the Songs of Ascent. In doing so, each has been seen from the perspective of The Temple service and Levites ascending the steps that led from the Court of the Gentiles upward toward The Temple, where Gentiles are not allowed.

Jamieson-Fausset-Brown Bible Commentary on Psalm 134 references this collection as the Pilgrim Psalms. Prior to the destruction of The Temple, Jews were to come up the Jerusalem for three Appointed Times. These are Pesach (Passover), Shavuot (Weeks or Pentecost), and Sukkot (Tabernacles, Tents or Booths)

I infer from the JFB commentary that the Pilgrims would be singing these Psalms as they made there way to Jerusalem.

How wonderful such a pilgrimage would have been, too. The words of Psalm 133, “Behold, how good and pleasant it is when brethren dwell in unity!” would echo through the hills. So marvelous!

I expect one day to make a final pilgrimage Jerusalemto a New Jerusalem where King Yeshua reigns. Oh, to sing those song with Brethren, to come The Feast, to dine with our L-RD, our King. Oh, how good it will be, how pleasant it will be, to truly dwell together in UNITY with King Yeshua.

Priestly Blessing


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